Bill Arlofski's blog

Part II: Apple iPads, Apple TVs, Bonjour & AirPlay Across Subnets Using Open-Source Software

In my previous post HERE, I gave a brief description of Apple's implementation of the mDNS protocol which they named "Bonjour". I explained why the protocol does not function in a segmented (subnetted) network and described the open-source solution that we deploy for our clients which is comprised of a free, open-source Gentoo Linux (virtual) server running the open-source implementation of the mDNS protocol called "Avahi."

My goal in this post is to describe in detail exactly how to implement your very own virtual "Bonjour Gateway" in a VMware vSphere environment.

Apple iPads, Apple TVs, Bonjour & AirPlay Across Subnets Using Open-Source Software

As more schools implement wireless networks, BYOD programs, and Apple TVs, they are quickly finding that on properly configured and subnetted networks they are unable to locate their wired Apple TVs with their wireless iPads, iPhones, Andriod devices, etc and therefore are unable to use Apple's "AirPlay" to stream music or videos to their Apple TVs, and are also unable to mirror their iPad's screen to the Apple TVs.

This is because the protocol by which Apple devices announce themselves and locate other Apple devices on a network does not work when these devices are on different subnets.

To find other Apple devices on a network, Apple devices use a protocol called "multicast DNS" (mDNS), and Apple has named their implementation of the mDNS protocol "Bonjour."

AppleTVs and other Apple devices on home networks don't have any problem locating each other. All the devices appear to magically "just work"(TM) together because all the devices are on the same subnet (broadcast domain) and Bonjour works perfectly fine in this type of small, non-routed network.

However, Bonjour is a multicast (broadcast) protocol, and as such does not traverse across routers to other subnets. When Apple devices are on a larger, properly segmented (subnetted) network, Apple devices on one subnet will not be able to locate Apple devices on another subnet.

Monitoring DAHDI channels on an Asterisk system with Xymon

With the severe thunderstorms and tornado warnings we have been recently subjected to, we inevitably end up having problems with the POTS lines connected to our Asterisk system. The problems have been due to either a physical issue between our office and the CO which the phone company has to repair, or a simple issue of forgetting to plug the POTS lines back into the analog card once the storms had passed.

The up side to this is that we have a very quiet morning with no ringing phones the day after a major storm, however the reality is that we may be missing important phone calls from our clients!

Generating Basic Bacula Backup Email Summary Reports (Original/Deprecated)

Update: 20170408 - A lot of work has been done to this script over the past four years. What started out as a "simple bash shell script" now has a lot of new options. Please use the latest version.

A request was made on the Bacula mailing list for a way to get daily and weekly backup reports. This got me to thinking that such a daily email would be useful.

So, off I went to write a simple bash shell script to generate these reports.

Keep in mind that this is a pretty simple report and it works for our needs. You may wish to modify it to include HTML formatting, additional fields such as StartTime and EndTime, total GB for all jobs, etc.